Saturday, February 26, 2011

The Banknote Building of Kaunas, Lithuania

There is a curvaceous, luminous, 10 story office building in Kaunas, Lithuania that was designed in the form of a Lithuania 1,000 Litu 1924 banknote. Office Center 1000, better known as the Banknote Building, was built in 2008 and is being touted locally as one of the Baltic region's most daring and original construction projects.

The exterior consists of 4,500 different pieces of glass with enamel designs, which are being slotted together like a giant jigsaw puzzle. The glass was made in the Netherlands and shipped over, and it can withstand even the most extreme Lithuanian weather.

Photo courtesy of RA Studija, architect







Friday, February 25, 2011

Taiwan 100 Yuan 2011 Commemorative Banknote

On 6 January 2011, the Central Bank of the Republic of China issued a new 100-dollar legal tender circulating commemorative in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Republic of China(Taiwan). The red paper note measures 145 × 70 mm and features a portrait of Dr. Sun Yat-Sen on the front, and the Chung-Shan Building on the back. The design is no different from the ordinary NT$100 note, except for the wording in Chinese language in the reverse of the note, which reads: "Celebrating the 100 years of founding of the Republic of China."


Huang Xin and Staff Reporter
China Times
2011-02-13 17:54 (GMT+8)

The Price of commemorative Taiwan 100-dollar notes (pictured) were pushed up by China's banknote collectors.

Sets of an uncut NT$100 currency sheet issued by Taiwan's central bank in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Republic of China earlier this year are selling like hot cakes in China's market for collectible notes.

Each uncut commemorative NT$100 currency sheet, comprised of three commemorative NT$100 banknotes in one sheet with special consecutive serial numbers, was sold for 1,500 Chinese yuan(US$227.4), over 16 times its original price of NT$500 (US$17) per set by Taiwan's central bank, a Taiwanese collector of stamps, coins and banknotes said.

While price speculation is prevalent in a range of products in China, such as alcohol, jade and other daily necessities, currency notes have recently become another target of speculative activity, the collector said.

The uncut commemorative NT$100 currency sheet, the first of its kind issued by Taiwan, has triggered a high interest in being bought among Internet surfers since the news of the issuance was posted on a Chinese website providing information about banknotes, the collector noted.

He said that some Chinese collectors had asked their Taiwanese peers to purchase the uncut commemorative currency sheets on their behalf. However, as the central bank stipulates that individuals can only buy two sets of sheets, and local collectors are also keen to take possession of such sets, most of them have turned down the request.

Anticipating that the price of the notes would rise further, collectors on the two sides across the Taiwan Strait have been in a buying panic, regardless of how much they would pay for them.

Currently, a set of the uncut commemorative sheets is sold for 1,450-1,600 yuan on Taobao.com., China's biggest online shopping platform.

According to industry experts, given that a set of uncut Chinese currency sheets issued in 1999 in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China sells for nearly 30,000 yuan, about 200 times its original price of 150 yuan, collectors are optimistic that the price of Taiwanese centennial NT$100 notes would continue to rise.

Due to a weak performance in the stock market in China last year, more and more capital has flowed into the vast Chinese market for collectible notes and driven prices higher, the expert noted.

Currently, the price of the first set of yuan from the 1948 issue has jumped to 4 million yuan on the market. Meanwhile, a five-cent bill from the second issue is sold for 550 yuan and a two-cent bill from the third issue is sold for 700 yuan, both being 100 times their face value.

Moreover, a one-cent bill in claret red color and a one-cent note with a green background color from the third issue are sold for 3,800 yuan and 2,500 yuan, respectively.

Significantly, a one-cent green overprint banknote from the 1962 issue now demands 30,000 yuan, the highest among all bills in the face value.









































Lebanon issued New 1,000, 50,000 and 100,000 Livres banknotes

Nutmegcollector
February 25, 2011

The Central Bank of Lebanon released new 1,000, 50,000 and 100,000 Livre notes into circulation on February 24, 2011. The notes were signed by the Governor of the Bank of Lebanon, Riad Salameh, and First Deputy Governor of the Bank of Lebanon, Mr Raed Sharaf al-Din. The banknotes also incorporated many new security features.

















































Friday, February 18, 2011

$1000 1907 Series Gold Certificate Fr. 1219b

CoinWeek
February 18, 2011 9:14 AM

In 1990, the sale of the Thompson Collection was the first public offering of the unique Fr. 1219b Series 1907 $1,000 Gold Certificate. Only 12,000 examples of the Series 1907 $1,000 Gold Certificate were issued during the joint tenure of James C. Napier and Lee McClung. They served together as Register of the Treasury and Treasurer for less than two years, between March 1911 and November 1912, making their signature combination on currency scarcer than most joint tenures of the time. The almost exclusive use as carefully accounted for, interbank monetary instruments nearly assured the redemption and subsequent destruction of most high denomination notes.

The design of this high denomination gold certificate is regal, employing a golden-yellow overprint and back design intended to remind the user of its status as a monetary instrument redeemable in gold coin on demand. Changes to the Federal Reserve Act on December 24, 1919 resulted in a minor design change to the $1000 Gold Certificates, a clause was placed over the bright $1000 overprint on the face. The change called an end to the Series 1907 issues and ushered in the slightly altered and not nearly as beautiful Series 1922 issues.

While many rarities considered unique among collectors since their kin are permanently impounded in institutional collections at the Smithsonian and Federal Reserve Banks, this note is the only example known in or out of government hands. Collectors now are even more determined to take home a rarity like this than ever before, and its status as a true numismatic rarity will command a price likely to well exceed its 2005 realization of $241,500 in the Taylor Family Collection Auction.

Monday, February 14, 2011

Altered Notes vs. Repaired Notes

Unaltered note









The serial numbers on the note have been altered to 000000000.








Chad Hawk, PMG Grader
Paper Money Guaranty
1/25/2011

There is a significant difference between notes that have been altered and those that have been repaired.

Here at PMG we have encountered several questions pertaining to the issue of altered notes compared to repaired notes. There is a significant difference between altered and repaired notes, which I’d like to point out here. The difference between a note that is altered and a note that is repaired is that a note that has been repaired has not been worked on to give the appearance of something different. It is being worked on to enhance the appearance of the note’s condition.

Altered notes are notes that have been worked on to give the appearance of another note. For example, many US Small Size notes have been altered to give the appearance of errors. We have seen dot matrix examples of printings on top of original notes in an effort to create double print errors, offset printing errors, inking errors, etc. We have also seen US notes that have been cut from BEP issued sheets incorrectly to give the appearance of a misalignment error. The notes are considered altered because the cutting did not occur during the issuing process.

Altering is very common in other parts of the world as well as the US. We have seen several Chinese notes altered to create the appearance of specimens. The original serial number on these notes is removed from the surface and replaced with the 000000 serial number that is used on specimens. On these same notes as well as other types, false overprints are also used to create the appearance of a specimen or other variety. We have seen several good alteration examples, so it is important to closely examine all notes. We have also seen notes with cancel holes that have been filled in to give the appearance of an issued note that had not been canceled. Some notes are much rarer in this form, so it is easy to see why altering occurs.

Repaired notes are notes that have been worked on to improve their appearance. If a note is discolored, a substance is often added to the surface to repair the stained area. Tears, splits, ink burn, etc. are often repaired with some type of adhesive to close the area and improve the overall appearance. Repairs are also done to increase the value of the note. If a cancel hole is filled in with something to create the appearance of a non-canceled note, this is NOT a repair. This is a form of altering the note rather than repairing the note. If a tear coming off a cancel hole is closed, but the hole remains open, the note has been repaired rather than altered.

There can be a fine difference between altered and repaired notes, so it is important to learn how to distinguish the two. Notes are repaired and altered to increase their value, so it is important to know as much information as possible when viewing notes and always expect the unexpected. People are increasingly working on notes as the industry continues to gain strength.

Sunday, February 13, 2011

The Commemorative Banknotes of Thailand

Thailand is one of the most prolific issuers of commemorative banknotes. Between 1987 and 2010, banknotes were issued to commemorate occasions such as the King's birthday, the Queen's birthday, Royal wedding anniversary, the King's accession to the throne, Centennial of Thai banknotes, birthday of Princess Mother and the anniversary of the Ministry of Finance. The commemorative banknotes were offered to the collectors at a premuim price over the face value. The extra money used to fund the King's many charitable projects.

The 60th Anniversary of the Royal Wedding of Their Majesties King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Queen Sirikit and the 60th Anniversary of the Coronation, Issued May 4, 2010

100-Baht commemorative banknotes are similar in characteristics and size to the 100-Baht banknotes, 15th Series, in curculation.










In the middle part are the portrait of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the reigning monarch, waving his hand, and that of Her Majesty Queen Sirikit. On the upper right corner is the Royal Garuda Emblem. Further down is the portrait of His Majesty the King during the coronation, printed in dark red over the elaborate circular design and the Thai art design printed in red, orangish red, orange and blue. Six Phikun floral motifs, printed in orange, are featured on the left of the elaborate circular design.
On the upper left corner is the Privy Seal of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej, printed in red over the Thailand’s national flag and the red and blue background design. Further down are the watermarks depicting the portrait of His Majesty the King and the special translucent classical Thai “Prajumyam” design. To the right of the watermarks is one part of the Arabic numerals “100” see-through design, printed in red and green in white circle. Under the watermarks are Thai words and expressions : “We will reign with righteousness, for the benefits and happiness of the Siamese people.”, “The Coronation Speech” and “5th May B.E. 2493”, printed in blue. Below are the background designs, printed in red and blue.


The King's 80th Birthday, Issued November 28, 2007

1-Baht banknote depicts the portrait of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the reigning monarch (Rama IX), the portrait of Their Majesties the King and the Queen granting an audience to various groups of people who paid tribute to His Majesty on the occasion of his coronation in 1950 at the Sutthaisawan Prasat Hall.

5-Baht banknote depicts the portrait of His Majesty in a royal procession by land, marking his 3rd Cycle Birthday Anniversary in 1963.

10-Baht banknote depicts the portrait of His Majesty granting an audience to various groups of people who paid tribute to His Majesty on the Auspicious Occasion of the 60th Anniversary Celebrations of His Majesty’s Accession to the Throne in 2006 at the Ananda Samakhom Throne Hall.












The reverse side depicts the portraits of His Majesty in his childhood, paying a royal visit, and performing royal activities.




















The 60th Anniversary of His Majesty the King's Accession to the Throne, Issued June 9, 2006

The portrait of His Majesty the King Bhumibol Adulyadej, seated on the Royal Throne surmounted by the Nine-Tiered Great White Umbrella of State in Amarin Winitchai Throne Hall.








The portrait of His Majesty the King Bhumibol Adulyadej while performing royal activities, Khun Dan Prakan Chon Dam in Nakon Nayok province and His Majesty the King visiting his people.









The Queen's 72nd Birthday, Issued August 4, 2004

The portrait of H.M. the King in the uniform of the Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces and the portrait of H.M. the Queen in Thai Sivalai with tiara.



















The portrait of H.M. the Queen wearing tiara and Thai Chakri.



















The Centennial of Thai Banknotes, Issued September 9, 2002

Their Majesties King Phumibol Adulyadej and King Chulalongkorn (King Rama V) in their regal attire, as the Thai banknotes was issued for the first time during the reign of King Rama V.











Almost identical to 100-Baht banknotes, 1st Series.












The 50th Wedding Anniversary of Their Majesties King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Queen Sirikit and the Coronation, Issued May 8, 2000

500000-Baht commemorative banknotes, are identical in characteristic and size with 50-Baht commemorative banknotes. Only 1998 pieces of the 500,000 Baht notes were printed.

The portrait of Their Majesties King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Queen SiriKit. The Monograms Phor Por Ror and Sor Kor, the picture of the Cornnation ceremony, the investiture ceremony of Her Majesty the Queen, the Guruda, and a flamboyant motif are supplementary elements.








The picture of Their Majesties the King and Queen during the wedding ceremony presided over by the Queen Grandmother.







































The King's 72th Birthday, Issued November 1, 1999

1000-Baht commemorative banknotes are similar in characteristics and size to the 1000-Baht banknotes, 15th Series, in curculation. The difference is that this type of banknote is affixed with the special Royal Crest commemorating the occasion of His Majesty the King's sixth cycle birthday anniversary celebration of December 5, 1999 in place of the Privy Seal.


















The Golden Jubilee Celebration of His Majesty's Accession to the Throne
, Issued 1996


They are identical in characteristics and size to 500-Baht banknotes, 14th Series, in circulation. The difference lies in that the Privy Seal is substituted by the special Royal Crest in Commemoration of the Golden Jubilee Celebration of His Majesty's Accession to the Throne.


















They are similar in characteristics and size to 50-Baht banknote, 13th Series, The differences lie in the fact that this type of banknote was printed on a polymer substrate, and the Krajung design is replaced by the Royal Crest in commemoration of the Golden Jubilee Celebration of His Majesty's accession to the Throne.



















The portrait of King Rama IX in regal attire seated on the Rajayan Phudtan Thong Throne.












His Majesty at work with supplementary elements regarding royally initiated projects in various fields.










The 120th Year Celebration of The Ministry of Finance
, Issued April 11, 1995


Commemorative banknotes printed on the auspicious occasion of the 120th celebration of the establishment of the Ministry of Finance, are of 10-Baht denomination. They are identical in characteristics and size to 10 Baht banknotes, 12th Series. The difference lies in the middle of the lower edge of the front of the note which is printed with the legend in brown, The 120th year of the Ministry of Finance, April 14, 1995.



















The 60th Birthday Celebration of H.M. Queen Sirikit
, Issued September 10, 1992


They are identical in characteristics and size to 1000 Baht banknotes, 14th Series, in circulation. The difference lies in the watermark of the portrait of H.M. Queen Sirikit.


















The 90th Birthday of Somdej Phra Srinagarindra Boromarajajonani
(H.R.H. the Princess Mother), Issued October 22, 1990


The banknotes of the two denominations are identical in characteristics and size to 50-Baht and 500-Baht banknotes, 13th Series, in circulation. The differences lie in the watermark of the portrait of H.R.H. the Princess Mother and the electrotype watermark of the number 90 in Thai numerals which is specially translucent. Under the watermark is the legend printed in blue for the 50-Baht commermorative banknotes and purple for the 500-Baht banknotes, Somdej Phra Srinagarindra Boromarajajonani 90 years old.










































The King's 60th Birthday, Issued December 8, 1987

The portait of King Rama IX in the uniform of the Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces, wearing a ceremonial robe, the Pudtan Kanchanasinghas Ceremonial Thone.


















Their Majesties the King and Queen, H.R.H Crown Princess Maha Vajiralongkorn, H.R.H. Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn and H.R.H. Princess Chulabhorn surround by their subjects.